iBankCoin
18 years in Wall Street, left after finding out it was all horseshit. Founder/ Master and Commander: iBankCoin, finance news and commentary from the future.
Joined Nov 10, 2007
18,359 Blog Posts

Here’s the Next Wall Street Bubble Trade: Ag-Biotech

Get inside of the fucking seed box.

This one is simple, since there are only 3-4 related names in the space so far.

RKDA came out with news regarding their Frankenstein wheat.

Arcadia Biosciences, Inc. (RKDA) has achieved two key technology milestones in its High Fiber Resistant Starch Wheat program. First, through advanced screening and traditional breeding techniques, the company has developed non-transgenic wheat varieties that contain up to 94 percent amylose, the highest levels available. Increased levels of amylose correspond to high levels of resistant starch, which has been proven to deliver significant health benefits. Second, these same wheat varieties deliver levels of total dietary fiber high enough to meet the threshold required by the FDA for a “Good Source” of fiber or “High in Fiber” designation on consumer packaging.

As a result of curing world hunger, this shit happened.

Doing a cursory keyword search in Exodus, I found three other companies in the agricultural biotech space: SEED, YTEN, and FLDM.

I bought both YTEN and SEED.

Regarding SEED, this one has an added bonus. Last year they inked a deal with RKDA to codevelop some Frankenstein corn. Should the corn work out half as well as the wheat, well then, the stock should trade to a billion.

Origin Agritech & Arcadia (RKDA) announce a collaboration to achieve the export of a corn biotech product developed in China to the US for completion of global regulatory trials; financial terms not disclosed (2.08) Arcadia and Origin signed an agreement under which Arcadia will assist Origin in developing information for submission to regulatory authorities in the U.S., China and other countries for the approval of their traits in corn. This project involves production of inbred and hybrid seed lines under quarantine conditions in Arcadia greenhouses. “The successful movement of this corn seed, containing an insect resistance/herbicide tolerance trait discovered and developed in China, to the Arcadia greenhouse represents a key milestone in Origin’s strategic business plan to achieve global regulatory approvals for cultivation and international grain movement.”

Markets are Yellen soft right now — but I am hopeful that the aforementioned companies above can soar on news of curing world hunger, feeding the children and the babies, making food great again.

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13 comments

  1. numbersgame

    The whole, “Are GMOs safe?” debate usually miises the point. It is like arguing “Are mushrooms safe?” or “is fire safe?”: there is no simple answer. Some are safe, but it’a likely some are not. Just because “corn” is a safe food, doesn’t mean that Chinese-bred corn with built-in insecticides is also safe for human consumption.

    At the very least, the FDA needs to regulate and test GMOs, and any product using GMOs as ingredients should be labeled as such.

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    • sarcrilege

      GMO is fake food. It’s not safe. Bugs die from the built in insecticides or they dont eat it. Why should it be safe for human consumption. It just makes sense that there will be side effects of some sort.

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  2. tradercaddy

    Ever read The Omnivore’s Dilemma?
    Interesting book (not saying I agree or disagree- just interesting and thought provoking).
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Omnivore%27s_Dilemma

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  3. Cricket

    The Achilles heel of the American war machine is not energy, or manufacturing or technology. It is food and agriculture. During 2017, America imported $138 billion of food, feeds and beverages. The average age of the American farmer has been steadily rising since 1982 and I understand this currently stands at 62 years. Most of these farmers are part timers, depending upon income from other (non-farm) work to pay the bills. It would take one or two generations to bring back American agriculture to the point of self sufficiency.

    Of course, by age 62, most of HRC’s GDP-producing constituents will be reclining in their Barcaloungers sipping wine and watching CNN while the lazy redneck farmers of fly over country (at least 250,000 of them being more than 75 years of age) continue to sweat and toil in their (GMO) corn fields.

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    • discoordinated

      Farming is such a strange business in the U.S. I live in an agricultural area and am considering starting an ag business. It really is different than any other business I have started.

      You have buyers all over saying they are dying to find more suppliers but when you start to talk pricing they aren’t willing to pay a decent amount per product. This is excepting the niche agricultural products which seem to have pretty good margins.

      I am no builder of economic models but I wonder if the pricing issues come from subsidies, international competition or both.

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      • numbersgame

        “You have buyers all over saying they are dying to find more suppliers but when you start to talk pricing they aren’t willing to pay a decent amount per product. ”

        This is the universal problem in US businesses. The result is that you have large corporations at the top making massive profits, while each level below them has smaller profit margins. Small buisinesses don’t have the economy of scale to compete. This works down to the labor level as well.

        Just look at banking. PBS/Frontline did an episode on the one bank that was prosecuted for fraud: “Abacus: Small Enough to Jail.” Look at all the fines that Wells Fargo, JPM, etc, had to pay. How many execs went to jail?

        Evn now, Congress (Rs & Ds) are trying to loosen restrictions on “community banks” with – $250B in assets. Think about that. With a mortgage size of $250k, a bank that size could hold mortages on ***1 million houses***. That’s NOT a community bank.

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    • numbersgame

      During 2017, America exported $133 billion of food, feeds and beverages.

      Alos, how much of the food produced in the US is by this mythical, “average farmer” you describe, wiping sweat off their brow and just trying to make ends meet? 70% of cropland is on farm larger than 500 acres (~340 football fields). That isn’t Uncle Jessie’s farm.

      So you have a duopoly of small farms like the ones you describe, and of agricorps that are pushing them out. Good news/bad news: these agricorps aren’t going away, and neither is the farmalnd so I doubt that food will be an issue for the US in my lifetime.

      Energy is a big problem, because while we have plety of oil, that oil takes a lot of resources to obtain and process, much more than in the past. It takes oil to make drill, pump, refien and deliver oil. Not to mention how much fresh water is used by fracking, and especailly shale.

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      • Cricket

        There is something like 2 million so-called ‘Principal’ farmers and another million or so others according to the USDA (2012):

        https://agcensus.usda.gov/Publications/2012/Online_Resources/Highlights/Farm_Demographics/

        Water is a problem too. Much of western agriculture is short of it. As far as I know, there are no large scale water distribution projects on the horizon – certainly not on the scale of FDR’s works.

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        • numbersgame

          That is a lot of good info and illustrates that there are a lot of small farms where people are struggling, as you stated. However, the issue is the same as other businesses: the larger farms have the influence, so bills isolated to helping small farms are hard to come by. Instead, the small farms are used to show the problem while the large farms collect the subsidies from the tax payer.

          Amazon is looking at $5,000,000,000.00 in tax breaks from NJ. How much of a tax break can a small business owner expect?

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  4. infinitezuul

    They’ve been selling fake lab-grown chicken in Boston for a couple years now. It is not advertised, but it’s the weirdest, most perfect chicken ever. Notably fake and something I try to avoid at all costs now. It’s so weird and unnatural… the meat is pure white with an odd consistency throughout. The skin isn’t really skin… lacks thickness and seems almost to be a wrapping added later.

    If you want to try it… Sweet Cheeks BBQ near Fenway [I LOVE this place… just don’t get the chicken] or State Park in Kendall Square [oddly enough right next to a ton of biotech companies].

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    • Fidel Cash Grow

      Lab grown meat is insane – perhaps that makes me old fashioned. Fly – based on this I would recommend a return to a vegan lifestyle STAT

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  5. masteroneass

    Good call. Total pump and dump. Buzz wordish. Green. Completely worthless besides hope and change. Probably was bought by some nutcase silicon valley trillionaire to save our simulation so musk can make a new weird ass looking car.

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  6. masteroneass

    I need to figure out how to spot these hype stocks before they hype. Wall Street is always looking for a new pump scheme. I think they can pump Rkda at least another 500 percent in th near term. Stock or product doesnt matter the hype does. More bubbles now.

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