iBankCoin
18 years in Wall Street, left after finding out it was all horseshit. Founder/ Master and Commander: iBankCoin, finance news and commentary from the future.
Joined Nov 10, 2007
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Mark Zuckerberg Issues Statement Regarding Cambridge Analytica

He just posted this via his Facebook page.

Look good to me. The stock is little changed for the day, +0.9%. It has lost roughly $36 billion in market cap since the scandal broke.

I want to share an update on the Cambridge Analytica situation — including the steps we’ve already taken and our next steps to address this important issue.

We have a responsibility to protect your data, and if we can’t then we don’t deserve to serve you. I’ve been working to understand exactly what happened and how to make sure this doesn’t happen again. The good news is that the most important actions to prevent this from happening again today we have already taken years ago. But we also made mistakes, there’s more to do, and we need to step up and do it.

Here’s a timeline of the events:

In 2007, we launched the Facebook Platform with the vision that more apps should be social. Your calendar should be able to show your friends’ birthdays, your maps should show where your friends live, and your address book should show their pictures. To do this, we enabled people to log into apps and share who their friends were and some information about them.

In 2013, a Cambridge University researcher named Aleksandr Kogan created a personality quiz app. It was installed by around 300,000 people who shared their data as well as some of their friends’ data. Given the way our platform worked at the time this meant Kogan was able to access tens of millions of their friends’ data.

In 2014, to prevent abusive apps, we announced that we were changing the entire platform to dramatically limit the data apps could access. Most importantly, apps like Kogan’s could no longer ask for data about a person’s friends unless their friends had also authorized the app. We also required developers to get approval from us before they could request any sensitive data from people. These actions would prevent any app like Kogan’s from being able to access so much data today.

In 2015, we learned from journalists at The Guardian that Kogan had shared data from his app with Cambridge Analytica. It is against our policies for developers to share data without people’s consent, so we immediately banned Kogan’s app from our platform, and demanded that Kogan and Cambridge Analytica formally certify that they had deleted all improperly acquired data. They provided these certifications.

Last week, we learned from The Guardian, The New York Times and Channel 4 that Cambridge Analytica may not have deleted the data as they had certified. We immediately banned them from using any of our services. Cambridge Analytica claims they have already deleted the data and has agreed to a forensic audit by a firm we hired to confirm this. We’re also working with regulators as they investigate what happened.

This was a breach of trust between Kogan, Cambridge Analytica and Facebook. But it was also a breach of trust between Facebook and the people who share their data with us and expect us to protect it. We need to fix that.

In this case, we already took the most important steps a few years ago in 2014 to prevent bad actors from accessing people’s information in this way. But there’s more we need to do and I’ll outline those steps here:

First, we will investigate all apps that had access to large amounts of information before we changed our platform to dramatically reduce data access in 2014, and we will conduct a full audit of any app with suspicious activity. We will ban any developer from our platform that does not agree to a thorough audit. And if we find developers that misused personally identifiable information, we will ban them and tell everyone affected by those apps. That includes people whose data Kogan misused here as well.

Second, we will restrict developers’ data access even further to prevent other kinds of abuse. For example, we will remove developers’ access to your data if you haven’t used their app in 3 months. We will reduce the data you give an app when you sign in — to only your name, profile photo, and email address. We’ll require developers to not only get approval but also sign a contract in order to ask anyone for access to their posts or other private data. And we’ll have more changes to share in the next few days.

Third, we want to make sure you understand which apps you’ve allowed to access your data. In the next month, we will show everyone a tool at the top of your News Feed with the apps you’ve used and an easy way to revoke those apps’ permissions to your data. We already have a tool to do this in your privacy settings, and now we will put this tool at the top of your News Feed to make sure everyone sees it.

Beyond the steps we had already taken in 2014, I believe these are the next steps we must take to continue to secure our platform.

I started Facebook, and at the end of the day I’m responsible for what happens on our platform. I’m serious about doing what it takes to protect our community. While this specific issue involving Cambridge Analytica should no longer happen with new apps today, that doesn’t change what happened in the past. We will learn from this experience to secure our platform further and make our community safer for everyone going forward.

I want to thank all of you who continue to believe in our mission and work to build this community together. I know it takes longer to fix all these issues than we’d like, but I promise you we’ll work through this and build a better service over the long term.

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13 comments

  1. acehood

    Nerd.

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  2. gappingandyapping
    gappingandyapping

    What a stupid statement, we saw the exact thing happen in 2012 yet it wasn’t a big deal then? Why is it a big deal for Facebook now, because people are complaining. Fuck that, why should you trust them. Then again, the Amerikan public is looking for any chance they can to give up their privacy. https://www.investors.com/politics/editorials/facebook-data-scandal-trump-election-obama-2012/

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    • Cricket

      It does not matter whether you or I join Facebook and give up our privacy; anyone who knows us well and is also a member of Facebook, especially relatives, will likely release enough information to make meaningful inferences about us. This is the hideous and insidious platform that is Facebook.

      Only a percentage of the data set is required to make valid inferences on the whole – using the same mathematical techniques that Turing used to break the enigma machine – a technique otherwise known as sequential inference.

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  3. ironbird

    Looks like they are blowing up social media by design.

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  4. sarcrilege

    And I am supposed to believe any statement from Zuckerberg, a Talmudic Jew whose religious books contain verses teaching (((them))) to cheat and exploit goyim? Facts are facts; these are the verses guiding (((them))) against goyim,
    https://tinyurl.com/3fkca2y

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    • speedius

      Since we’re being racist here, it struck me as very Chinese- “apologize when caught” is the only moral dictum.

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    • sarcrilege

      …but wait! There’s more! We need a scholar here to help us understand this. I am sure it’s nothing, right?
      https://tinyurl.com/y92u46aq

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  5. soupbone

    MSM pissing on Facebook and Zuckerburg today.

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  6. fryguy15

    Ohh, so his solution is… don’t worry, we will self-regulate. Ha! Bullshit. I’m all about small government, but this kind of shit has got to be enforced by law. What they are doing is a flagrant invasion of privacy.

    From what I understand, you don’t even have to have a FB account for them to collect data on you due to their “like” buttons and beacons all over the internet. The scary part is you can’t even opt out, because (1) you have no idea which pages have beacons / like buttons before you visit them and/or (2) you don’t even have a FB account.

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  7. TJWP

    Facebook will collapse under the weight of its own illegality. There are already class action lawsuits.

    Do you honestly think this was a one off?

    Do you honestly think this data was not sold to anyone with the money to pay?

    Do you honestly think this was some rogue employee and not sanctioned by the executives?

    Do you honestly think there will be no consequences for their already confirmed political bias and special access for political parties?

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    • sarcrilege

      FB will not go away, like mySpace, for as long as gullible people continue using it and providing it with truthful personal information. FB is part of the jewmedia cartel supported by the surveillance state apparatus which has the judiciary in its backpocket. Stupid people just have to stop using FB — there’s no other way to eliminate this monster; just like YTube, Goolag, etc.

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