Bought Back More HCLP for $59.39

Over the past week or so, I raised cash to 25%. This was good fortune, as HCLP, my mantelpiece position, has dropped 8% since I let up.

Today, I repurchased half of those shares, which I sold at $64.19 each, for $59.39.

It seems like good enough of a bet to me. HCLP is growing so fast… it’s trading at just over 17x Q3 2014 earnings estimates. I have no good way to guess what HCLP’s earning’s potential is over time; but 17x doesn’t seem unreasonable, particularly with a steady announcement of 5 year supply agreements being announced and 200% revenue growth last year. When you’ve managed to get in on the ground floor of such a high flying position, it just makes sense to hold long a core stake, and ride the waves.

This 8% drop is just another opportunity to make extra money, until such time as that logic is challenged. For the moment, HCLP just managed to touch its 20 day moving average for the first time since early June.

Next earnings announcement is in August. So tell me, who wants to stand in the way of this thing?

BAS Just Saved My Day

If not for Basic Energy Services turning on a dime and sprinting away from the rest of the trash that comprises this trading session, I would be having a pretty bad day.

UEC is down over 50% since I bought it. Mind you, as I have stated repeatedly, it is a small position. At its peak, it was under 5% of my account. So I’m not panicked here. But damn it, that was my 5%.

Give me my money back.

The trouble with the uranium miners (and the reason I’ve been very adamant up until now to just keep it simple and avoid the smaller businesses) is pretty forwardly summed up in UEC’s latest filing. They sold $0.00 in revenue in the first three months of 2014.

That’s $0.00.

The 2014 YEAR OF URANIUM BLISS (or whatever the hell I called it) …has been cancelled. Uranium spot just nosedived this week and, even though I suspect this flash crash is nearer the end of the turmoil, that kind of godless price action can only portend one thing.

Somebody is about to get liquidated.

I just pray it isn’t UEC.

CCJ is treading water daily. It’s all she can do to hold the line, but one false move and it’s a quick list to the side and down she goes.

The rest of my positions are holding up fairly well, actually. The multifamily theme remains tantalizing, particularly now that the primary argument against them – a resurgence in homeownership rates and a drop in occupancy for rentals – is such obvious bunk. AEC and MAA should continue to perform.

NRP has held up decent enough, following the 25% washout it took this year. That’s probably been my worst idea so far in 2014. But they are getting things under control, I have a hunch coal may be a terrific investment here, and I get to collect 8% annually while I wait.

I’m definitely not +10% for the year anymore, but there’s another 8 months to make something happen yet. My fear isn’t my positions, it’s what consequence an entire index of investors getting their combined comeuppance will have on me.

The NASDAQ traders got stupid. Real stupid. Will that spill over to me? It’s looking likely.

Like it or not, the stock market tends to take on a real flare of the vineyard effect. You pop up five vineyards next to each other, they all do well. Plenty of room to visit each, for the patrons. In fact, it draws in more business.

But if one of those bastards let’s an infestation go unattended; suddenly you have nothing but tears and reek wine.

Tesla earnings are out after the bell. Let’s see what happens there.

HCLP Earnings Are Out

I’ve been keeping up on earnings for my companies as they post, but I haven’t quite had the spare time to translate everything I’m thinking into posts. It’s been a rapid series of reports and not quite enough time to write out my thoughts on the subject.

Rest assured, if there had been any big deviations from the plans, I’d tell you.

As HCLP has been a particularly precious position and given how closely I’m tracking, it merits special consideration.

The company guided in on revenues and missed on earnings (depending on who you ask). But neither of that matters. This is what is actually important:

The company continues to see rapid increases in demand for product. Tonight, in addition to reporting earnings, they also announced another amended contract that, and I quote, “…significantly increases the annual committed volumes under the agreement signed in March and extends the term by two more years.”

No, you’re not seeing things. HCLP just amended this same contract two months ago. I guess realities on the ground have already changed so much that they were afforded the luxury of re-renegotiating.

I look at the last press release from March, where they announced the original amendment to the Weatherford contract, which was to be in place for a further three years, at a specified (then higher) volume of sand, for a higher price.

So two months later, that contract has become a five year contract for even higher volumes.

Yes I do like the sound of that. You can bank on these developments flowing through the natural gas producers and well servicing sectors soon enough. High demand for sand means high demand for gas.

Natural gas inventory is at eleven year lows and there is lingering concern that adverse weather this year could put real pressure on refilling storage. This would translate to pressure on users for higher prices and alleviate much of the residual pessimism surrounding natural gas from 2011.

The natural gas game is on.

BAS Taken Out Back And Shot

Basic Energy Services blew past analyst expectations, recording a smaller than expected loss, announcing above average revenue growth expectations, and that they were so excited by all of this that they will be jacking up investment activity even more than prior announcements.

The stock is off 8% after the open.

I don’t know what shareholders were expecting…but given the run from $16 to $28 followed by this, I have to suspect it was ‘the moon’.

The company is afforded the benefit of the doubt in my opinion. I’ll look at the SEC filing then decide if I want to lock in some gains or let it ride. But I’m predisposed to let it ride.

Mind you, today’s plunge doesn’t even take the stock back to the 50 day moving average. My guess is this will resolve quickly, affording a good buying opportunity.

Natural gas is going to be huge this decade.

BAS Earnings After The Close

Basic Energy Services, one of my most favorite positions, is reporting Q1 earnings after the close.

The stock is up ~80% since the start of the year. Accordingly, it is being afforded a little break today, while longs lock in some gains.

Cain Hammond Thaler will not be among the profiteers, as he is resting self-assuredly in his 9th floor office, indifferent to the prospect of a BAS sell off. Cocky, even.

Natural gas spot pricing is back to $4.70. That is a huge rebound from the mighty flush out that first put the natural gas sector on ice. Since which time, BAS and strengthened their corporate entity, engaging in buy outs and solidifying the balance sheet.

Let’s see what they can do.

Look what fracking company just landed another long term supply contract

HCLP just amended another supply agreement to jack up the amount of sand one of their customers is obligated to buy every month. This is the third one this year.

Per MarketWatch
:

Houston, Texas – April 8, 2014 – Hi-Crush Partners LP (NYSE: HCLP), or Hi-Crush, today announced the entry into of an amendment to the supply agreement between Hi-Crush Operating LLC, a subsidiary of Hi-Crush, and FTS International, LLC, or FTSI, a leading provider of well completion services. The amendment significantly increases the number of committed volumes under the agreement, extends the term of the supply agreement and requires FTSI to pay a specified price for a specified minimum volume of frac sand each month. “Hi-Crush is excited to further extend and strengthen our relationship with FTSI by entering into this amendment,” said James M. Whipkey, Co-Chief Executive Officer of Hi-Crush. “We consider FTSI a valuable partner as we continue to expand our market presence, and fulfilling our customers’ needs is a top priority for Hi-Crush.”

And when they say “requires FTSI to pay a specified price for a specified minimum volume of frac sand each month.”…question? Do you suppose that would mean a higher “specified price”?

I would suppose it would.

This follows the news yesterday that HCLP was going to have themselves an offering to completely buy out any competing interests in their Augusta facility.

Read here:

Houston, Texas – April 8, 2014 – Hi-Crush Partners LP HCLP +2.31% (“Hi-Crush” or the “Partnership”) announced today that it has entered into a contribution agreement with Hi-Crush Proppants LLC (the “Sponsor”) to acquire certain equity interests in Hi-Crush Augusta LLC (“Augusta”), the entity that owns the Sponsor’s raw frac sand processing facility located in Augusta, Wisconsin. As previously announced, Hi-Crush acquired a preferred interest in Augusta on January 31, 2013.

“We are delighted to announce this acquisition, which we expect to be immediately accretive,” said Robert E. Rasmus, Co-Chief Executive Officer of Hi-Crush. “With this transaction, we will double the Partnership’s production capacity to 3.2 million tons per year. The Augusta plant has a current capacity of 1.6 million tons of coarse Northern White frac sand per year. Beyond that, we have the capability to expand the Augusta plant by an additional 800,000 tons per year and have started the process to obtain the permits required for this expansion. The expansion will bring total rated capacity at the Partnership to 4 million tons per year. We expect the expanded capacity to come on-line in the second half of 2014.”

Under the terms of the transaction, the Partnership will pay cash consideration of $224.25 million. At the closing of the acquisition, the Partnership’s preferred equity interest in Augusta (currently providing $3.75 million in distributions per quarter) will be converted into common equity interests in Augusta, and the Partnership will own 98% of Augusta’s common equity interests. “We expect that the acquisition of common equity interests in Augusta will contribute more than $30 million of incremental annual EBITDA to the Partnership, before any expansion to the Augusta plant,” said Mr. Rasmus. The acquisition is expected to close by mid-May 2014, subject to regulatory approvals and other closing conditions. In connection with the acquisition, Hi-Crush expects to refinance its existing revolving credit facility.

We need to follow the sand. Where the sand goes, the profits will go also. No buyouts – if these guys enter into a cash offer for my units on my behalf, I’m going to blow a gasket.

These moves are going to double HCLP’s revenue immediately. That will play into the hand of existing investors as bigger operations allow the executives of HCLP to leverage their logistics operations and gain market share.

I’m not even going to look to see if HCLP is paying top dollar premium on this deal – I’ll spare you the time, the answer is “I don’t care.”

This trend in the economy is only growing. These guys survived Aubrey McClendon blowing up the natural gas sector, and together with targeted well services like BAS, they’re going to dominate.

The shares aren’t even phased at the announced dilution yesterday to pay for the acquisition. Have a look.

04-09-14 HCLP 18 Months

Here’s the tagline:

HCLP – This Shit Is Going Higher

Bought Back More HCLP for $59.39

Over the past week or so, I raised cash to 25%. This was good fortune, as HCLP, my mantelpiece position, has dropped 8% since I let up.

Today, I repurchased half of those shares, which I sold at $64.19 each, for $59.39.

It seems like good enough of a bet to me. HCLP is growing so fast… it’s trading at just over 17x Q3 2014 earnings estimates. I have no good way to guess what HCLP’s earning’s potential is over time; but 17x doesn’t seem unreasonable, particularly with a steady announcement of 5 year supply agreements being announced and 200% revenue growth last year. When you’ve managed to get in on the ground floor of such a high flying position, it just makes sense to hold long a core stake, and ride the waves.

This 8% drop is just another opportunity to make extra money, until such time as that logic is challenged. For the moment, HCLP just managed to touch its 20 day moving average for the first time since early June.

Next earnings announcement is in August. So tell me, who wants to stand in the way of this thing?

BAS Just Saved My Day

If not for Basic Energy Services turning on a dime and sprinting away from the rest of the trash that comprises this trading session, I would be having a pretty bad day.

UEC is down over 50% since I bought it. Mind you, as I have stated repeatedly, it is a small position. At its peak, it was under 5% of my account. So I’m not panicked here. But damn it, that was my 5%.

Give me my money back.

The trouble with the uranium miners (and the reason I’ve been very adamant up until now to just keep it simple and avoid the smaller businesses) is pretty forwardly summed up in UEC’s latest filing. They sold $0.00 in revenue in the first three months of 2014.

That’s $0.00.

The 2014 YEAR OF URANIUM BLISS (or whatever the hell I called it) …has been cancelled. Uranium spot just nosedived this week and, even though I suspect this flash crash is nearer the end of the turmoil, that kind of godless price action can only portend one thing.

Somebody is about to get liquidated.

I just pray it isn’t UEC.

CCJ is treading water daily. It’s all she can do to hold the line, but one false move and it’s a quick list to the side and down she goes.

The rest of my positions are holding up fairly well, actually. The multifamily theme remains tantalizing, particularly now that the primary argument against them – a resurgence in homeownership rates and a drop in occupancy for rentals – is such obvious bunk. AEC and MAA should continue to perform.

NRP has held up decent enough, following the 25% washout it took this year. That’s probably been my worst idea so far in 2014. But they are getting things under control, I have a hunch coal may be a terrific investment here, and I get to collect 8% annually while I wait.

I’m definitely not +10% for the year anymore, but there’s another 8 months to make something happen yet. My fear isn’t my positions, it’s what consequence an entire index of investors getting their combined comeuppance will have on me.

The NASDAQ traders got stupid. Real stupid. Will that spill over to me? It’s looking likely.

Like it or not, the stock market tends to take on a real flare of the vineyard effect. You pop up five vineyards next to each other, they all do well. Plenty of room to visit each, for the patrons. In fact, it draws in more business.

But if one of those bastards let’s an infestation go unattended; suddenly you have nothing but tears and reek wine.

Tesla earnings are out after the bell. Let’s see what happens there.

HCLP Earnings Are Out

I’ve been keeping up on earnings for my companies as they post, but I haven’t quite had the spare time to translate everything I’m thinking into posts. It’s been a rapid series of reports and not quite enough time to write out my thoughts on the subject.

Rest assured, if there had been any big deviations from the plans, I’d tell you.

As HCLP has been a particularly precious position and given how closely I’m tracking, it merits special consideration.

The company guided in on revenues and missed on earnings (depending on who you ask). But neither of that matters. This is what is actually important:

The company continues to see rapid increases in demand for product. Tonight, in addition to reporting earnings, they also announced another amended contract that, and I quote, “…significantly increases the annual committed volumes under the agreement signed in March and extends the term by two more years.”

No, you’re not seeing things. HCLP just amended this same contract two months ago. I guess realities on the ground have already changed so much that they were afforded the luxury of re-renegotiating.

I look at the last press release from March, where they announced the original amendment to the Weatherford contract, which was to be in place for a further three years, at a specified (then higher) volume of sand, for a higher price.

So two months later, that contract has become a five year contract for even higher volumes.

Yes I do like the sound of that. You can bank on these developments flowing through the natural gas producers and well servicing sectors soon enough. High demand for sand means high demand for gas.

Natural gas inventory is at eleven year lows and there is lingering concern that adverse weather this year could put real pressure on refilling storage. This would translate to pressure on users for higher prices and alleviate much of the residual pessimism surrounding natural gas from 2011.

The natural gas game is on.

BAS Taken Out Back And Shot

Basic Energy Services blew past analyst expectations, recording a smaller than expected loss, announcing above average revenue growth expectations, and that they were so excited by all of this that they will be jacking up investment activity even more than prior announcements.

The stock is off 8% after the open.

I don’t know what shareholders were expecting…but given the run from $16 to $28 followed by this, I have to suspect it was ‘the moon’.

The company is afforded the benefit of the doubt in my opinion. I’ll look at the SEC filing then decide if I want to lock in some gains or let it ride. But I’m predisposed to let it ride.

Mind you, today’s plunge doesn’t even take the stock back to the 50 day moving average. My guess is this will resolve quickly, affording a good buying opportunity.

Natural gas is going to be huge this decade.

BAS Earnings After The Close

Basic Energy Services, one of my most favorite positions, is reporting Q1 earnings after the close.

The stock is up ~80% since the start of the year. Accordingly, it is being afforded a little break today, while longs lock in some gains.

Cain Hammond Thaler will not be among the profiteers, as he is resting self-assuredly in his 9th floor office, indifferent to the prospect of a BAS sell off. Cocky, even.

Natural gas spot pricing is back to $4.70. That is a huge rebound from the mighty flush out that first put the natural gas sector on ice. Since which time, BAS and strengthened their corporate entity, engaging in buy outs and solidifying the balance sheet.

Let’s see what they can do.

Look what fracking company just landed another long term supply contract

HCLP just amended another supply agreement to jack up the amount of sand one of their customers is obligated to buy every month. This is the third one this year.

Per MarketWatch
:

Houston, Texas – April 8, 2014 – Hi-Crush Partners LP (NYSE: HCLP), or Hi-Crush, today announced the entry into of an amendment to the supply agreement between Hi-Crush Operating LLC, a subsidiary of Hi-Crush, and FTS International, LLC, or FTSI, a leading provider of well completion services. The amendment significantly increases the number of committed volumes under the agreement, extends the term of the supply agreement and requires FTSI to pay a specified price for a specified minimum volume of frac sand each month. “Hi-Crush is excited to further extend and strengthen our relationship with FTSI by entering into this amendment,” said James M. Whipkey, Co-Chief Executive Officer of Hi-Crush. “We consider FTSI a valuable partner as we continue to expand our market presence, and fulfilling our customers’ needs is a top priority for Hi-Crush.”

And when they say “requires FTSI to pay a specified price for a specified minimum volume of frac sand each month.”…question? Do you suppose that would mean a higher “specified price”?

I would suppose it would.

This follows the news yesterday that HCLP was going to have themselves an offering to completely buy out any competing interests in their Augusta facility.

Read here:

Houston, Texas – April 8, 2014 – Hi-Crush Partners LP HCLP +2.31% (“Hi-Crush” or the “Partnership”) announced today that it has entered into a contribution agreement with Hi-Crush Proppants LLC (the “Sponsor”) to acquire certain equity interests in Hi-Crush Augusta LLC (“Augusta”), the entity that owns the Sponsor’s raw frac sand processing facility located in Augusta, Wisconsin. As previously announced, Hi-Crush acquired a preferred interest in Augusta on January 31, 2013.

“We are delighted to announce this acquisition, which we expect to be immediately accretive,” said Robert E. Rasmus, Co-Chief Executive Officer of Hi-Crush. “With this transaction, we will double the Partnership’s production capacity to 3.2 million tons per year. The Augusta plant has a current capacity of 1.6 million tons of coarse Northern White frac sand per year. Beyond that, we have the capability to expand the Augusta plant by an additional 800,000 tons per year and have started the process to obtain the permits required for this expansion. The expansion will bring total rated capacity at the Partnership to 4 million tons per year. We expect the expanded capacity to come on-line in the second half of 2014.”

Under the terms of the transaction, the Partnership will pay cash consideration of $224.25 million. At the closing of the acquisition, the Partnership’s preferred equity interest in Augusta (currently providing $3.75 million in distributions per quarter) will be converted into common equity interests in Augusta, and the Partnership will own 98% of Augusta’s common equity interests. “We expect that the acquisition of common equity interests in Augusta will contribute more than $30 million of incremental annual EBITDA to the Partnership, before any expansion to the Augusta plant,” said Mr. Rasmus. The acquisition is expected to close by mid-May 2014, subject to regulatory approvals and other closing conditions. In connection with the acquisition, Hi-Crush expects to refinance its existing revolving credit facility.

We need to follow the sand. Where the sand goes, the profits will go also. No buyouts – if these guys enter into a cash offer for my units on my behalf, I’m going to blow a gasket.

These moves are going to double HCLP’s revenue immediately. That will play into the hand of existing investors as bigger operations allow the executives of HCLP to leverage their logistics operations and gain market share.

I’m not even going to look to see if HCLP is paying top dollar premium on this deal – I’ll spare you the time, the answer is “I don’t care.”

This trend in the economy is only growing. These guys survived Aubrey McClendon blowing up the natural gas sector, and together with targeted well services like BAS, they’re going to dominate.

The shares aren’t even phased at the announced dilution yesterday to pay for the acquisition. Have a look.

04-09-14 HCLP 18 Months

Here’s the tagline:

HCLP – This Shit Is Going Higher

Previous Posts by Mr. Cain Thaler