Sunday Matinee at Chess Cinemas

MV5BMTYyNDkwODc0NV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTYwMDY2NTM5._V1_SX214_AL_

Avalon (1990) is another very good Barry Levinson-directed film set in his hometown of Baltimore, Maryland. This one hits the right notes in terms of blending a family-centered melodrama with some comedy and romance.

Aidan Quinn, Elizabeth Perkins, Armin Mueller-Stahl, a young Elijah Wood, and Kevin Pollack highlight the solid cast.

From imdb:

A Polish-Jewish family arrives in the US at the beginning of the century and they and their children try to build themselves a better future in the promised land.

Saturday Night at Chess Cinemas

0518109_11163_MC_Tx360

Headed into the serious part of the Major League Baseball season, not to mention seeing tomorrow’s (hopefully steroid-free) stars in the Little League World Series, I am going to suggest The Natural (1984) for a solid, late-summer night viewing.

Based on the Bernard Malamud novel and directed by the estimable Barry Levinson, this Robert Redford vehicle is part period piece, part romance, part drama, and all mystique; It has stood the test of time and is still widely-refereced a full thirty years after its release.

Other notable performances include Glenn Close, a cagey Robert Duvall, Barbara Hershey, and the great Wilford Brimley. An elder statesmen role played by Richard Farnsworth, and a younger Michael Madsen also add to the high quality cast.

You will not find too many films with better cinematography, to boot.

via imdb:

An unknown middle-aged batter named Roy Hobbs with a mysterious past appears out of nowhere to take a losing 1930s baseball team to the top of the league in this magical sports fantasy. With the aid of a bat cut from a lightning struck tree, Hobbs lives the fame he should have had earlier when, as a rising pitcher, he is inexplicably shot by a young woman.

Saturday Night at Chess Cinemas

Wolf

Wolf (1994) may not rank among the very top films that Jack Nicholson, Michelle Pfeiffer, and James Spader have starred in, but it sure is a good time.

Nicholson plays a book publisher-turned-werewolf-at-night fighting to save his career against the cutthroat Spader, with Pfeiffer the main love interest.

The film was released twenty years ago during the summer, and directed by the great Mike Nichols.

Also notable in the cast are David Hyde Pierce and Christopher Plummer.

On a slow summer Saturday night, it is worth checking out.

Sunday Matinee at Chess Cinemas

American-Pie-movie-01

It’s hard to believe that it has been fifteen years since American Pie (1999) was released.

I remember watching this movie, out of tradition, the night before a big exam in law school to unwind and get into a relaxed frame of mind after the studying had been done.

This is a classic comedy, ahead of its time in some respects, with memorable and often-quoted characters like Stifler, Oz, Jimbo, and Finch, among others.

Check it out, or re-watch it.

Sunday Matinee at Chess Cinemas

the-bridge-on-the-river-kwai

With its unforgettable and timeless theme tune, The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957) is certainly worth a viewing. William Holden, Alec Guinness, and Jack Hawkins lead a spirited cast in this World War II epic.

via imdb:

After settling his differences with a Japanese PoW camp commander, a British colonel co-operates to oversee his men’s construction of a railway bridge for their captors – while oblivious to a plan by the Allies to destroy it.

Saturday Night at Chess Cinemas

the-sting-by-bamdotorg11

The Sting (1973) is a top twenty film for me, as Paul Newman and Robert Redford team up to pull the con of all cons versus a criminal banker.

Robert Shaw and Charles Durning add to the gritty yet playful nature of the period piece set in 1930′s Chicago, where the slightest hand gesture can be the tipoff that you are about to get fleeced in a horse race.

Check it out.

Via Youtube:

Directed by George Roy Hill and starring Paul Newman Robert Redford Robert Shaw Charles Durning and Ray Walston Set in the 1930′s this intricate caper deals with an ambitious small-time crook and a veteran con man who seek revenge on a vicious crime lord who murdered one of their gang. Universal – 1973

Sunday Matinee at Chess Cinemas

MV5BMTYyNDkwODc0NV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTYwMDY2NTM5._V1_SX214_AL_

Avalon (1990) is another very good Barry Levinson-directed film set in his hometown of Baltimore, Maryland. This one hits the right notes in terms of blending a family-centered melodrama with some comedy and romance.

Aidan Quinn, Elizabeth Perkins, Armin Mueller-Stahl, a young Elijah Wood, and Kevin Pollack highlight the solid cast.

From imdb:

A Polish-Jewish family arrives in the US at the beginning of the century and they and their children try to build themselves a better future in the promised land.

Saturday Night at Chess Cinemas

0518109_11163_MC_Tx360

Headed into the serious part of the Major League Baseball season, not to mention seeing tomorrow’s (hopefully steroid-free) stars in the Little League World Series, I am going to suggest The Natural (1984) for a solid, late-summer night viewing.

Based on the Bernard Malamud novel and directed by the estimable Barry Levinson, this Robert Redford vehicle is part period piece, part romance, part drama, and all mystique; It has stood the test of time and is still widely-refereced a full thirty years after its release.

Other notable performances include Glenn Close, a cagey Robert Duvall, Barbara Hershey, and the great Wilford Brimley. An elder statesmen role played by Richard Farnsworth, and a younger Michael Madsen also add to the high quality cast.

You will not find too many films with better cinematography, to boot.

via imdb:

An unknown middle-aged batter named Roy Hobbs with a mysterious past appears out of nowhere to take a losing 1930s baseball team to the top of the league in this magical sports fantasy. With the aid of a bat cut from a lightning struck tree, Hobbs lives the fame he should have had earlier when, as a rising pitcher, he is inexplicably shot by a young woman.

Saturday Night at Chess Cinemas

Wolf

Wolf (1994) may not rank among the very top films that Jack Nicholson, Michelle Pfeiffer, and James Spader have starred in, but it sure is a good time.

Nicholson plays a book publisher-turned-werewolf-at-night fighting to save his career against the cutthroat Spader, with Pfeiffer the main love interest.

The film was released twenty years ago during the summer, and directed by the great Mike Nichols.

Also notable in the cast are David Hyde Pierce and Christopher Plummer.

On a slow summer Saturday night, it is worth checking out.

Sunday Matinee at Chess Cinemas

American-Pie-movie-01

It’s hard to believe that it has been fifteen years since American Pie (1999) was released.

I remember watching this movie, out of tradition, the night before a big exam in law school to unwind and get into a relaxed frame of mind after the studying had been done.

This is a classic comedy, ahead of its time in some respects, with memorable and often-quoted characters like Stifler, Oz, Jimbo, and Finch, among others.

Check it out, or re-watch it.

Sunday Matinee at Chess Cinemas

the-bridge-on-the-river-kwai

With its unforgettable and timeless theme tune, The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957) is certainly worth a viewing. William Holden, Alec Guinness, and Jack Hawkins lead a spirited cast in this World War II epic.

via imdb:

After settling his differences with a Japanese PoW camp commander, a British colonel co-operates to oversee his men’s construction of a railway bridge for their captors – while oblivious to a plan by the Allies to destroy it.

Saturday Night at Chess Cinemas

the-sting-by-bamdotorg11

The Sting (1973) is a top twenty film for me, as Paul Newman and Robert Redford team up to pull the con of all cons versus a criminal banker.

Robert Shaw and Charles Durning add to the gritty yet playful nature of the period piece set in 1930′s Chicago, where the slightest hand gesture can be the tipoff that you are about to get fleeced in a horse race.

Check it out.

Via Youtube:

Directed by George Roy Hill and starring Paul Newman Robert Redford Robert Shaw Charles Durning and Ray Walston Set in the 1930′s this intricate caper deals with an ambitious small-time crook and a veteran con man who seek revenge on a vicious crime lord who murdered one of their gang. Universal – 1973

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