Saturday Night at Chess Cinemas

Wolf

Wolf (1994) may not rank among the very top films that Jack Nicholson, Michelle Pfeiffer, and James Spader have starred in, but it sure is a good time.

Nicholson plays a book publisher-turned-werewolf-at-night fighting to save his career against the cutthroat Spader, with Pfeiffer the main love interest.

The film was released twenty years ago during the summer, and directed by the great Mike Nichols.

Also notable in the cast are David Hyde Pierce and Christopher Plummer.

On a slow summer Saturday night, it is worth checking out.

Sunday Matinee at Chess Cinemas

American-Pie-movie-01

It’s hard to believe that it has been fifteen years since American Pie (1999) was released.

I remember watching this movie, out of tradition, the night before a big exam in law school to unwind and get into a relaxed frame of mind after the studying had been done.

This is a classic comedy, ahead of its time in some respects, with memorable and often-quoted characters like Stifler, Oz, Jimbo, and Finch, among others.

Check it out, or re-watch it.

Sunday Matinee at Chess Cinemas

the-bridge-on-the-river-kwai

With its unforgettable and timeless theme tune, The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957) is certainly worth a viewing. William Holden, Alec Guinness, and Jack Hawkins lead a spirited cast in this World War II epic.

via imdb:

After settling his differences with a Japanese PoW camp commander, a British colonel co-operates to oversee his men’s construction of a railway bridge for their captors – while oblivious to a plan by the Allies to destroy it.

Saturday Night at Chess Cinemas

the-sting-by-bamdotorg11

The Sting (1973) is a top twenty film for me, as Paul Newman and Robert Redford team up to pull the con of all cons versus a criminal banker.

Robert Shaw and Charles Durning add to the gritty yet playful nature of the period piece set in 1930′s Chicago, where the slightest hand gesture can be the tipoff that you are about to get fleeced in a horse race.

Check it out.

Via Youtube:

Directed by George Roy Hill and starring Paul Newman Robert Redford Robert Shaw Charles Durning and Ray Walston Set in the 1930′s this intricate caper deals with an ambitious small-time crook and a veteran con man who seek revenge on a vicious crime lord who murdered one of their gang. Universal – 1973

Saturday Night at Chess Cinemas

vlcsnap-2010-08-31-01h43m07s108.png

One of Ben Stiller’s better non-comedy performances can be seen portraying a real-life drug addict in Permanent Midnight (1998), also starring the stunning Maria Bello and Owen Wilson.

Critics and audiences alike did not seem too fond of this film, but I believe it is underrated and worth a viewing.

via imdb.com

Comedy writer Jerry Stahl, whose $6000-a-week heroin habit had him taking his infant daughter along on his drug runs and doing smack during TV script conferences. Departing detox, Stahl explores memories with survivor Kitty, who listens patiently to Stahl’s flashback. Other women in Stahl’s life are his British wife Sandra and his agent Vola. For the TV series “Mr. Chompers” (inspired by ALF), Stahl meets with sitcom exec Craig Ziffer and puppeteer Allen. For freaky freebasing, Stahl hangs with mumbler Nicky and druggie Gus.

Sunday Matinee at Chess Cinemas

Battle-at-Fort-McHenry

I present a double feature on this Fourth of July weekend matinee.

First, we have Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942), starring the great James Cagney in a biography of the talented musical composer, playwright, actor, dancer, and singer George M. Cohan.

Next, a grittier and more controversial watch is Born on the Fourth of July (1989), directed by Oliver Stone and starring Tom Cruise as a paralyzed and disgruntled Vietnam Vet.

 

Saturday Night at Chess Cinemas

Wolf

Wolf (1994) may not rank among the very top films that Jack Nicholson, Michelle Pfeiffer, and James Spader have starred in, but it sure is a good time.

Nicholson plays a book publisher-turned-werewolf-at-night fighting to save his career against the cutthroat Spader, with Pfeiffer the main love interest.

The film was released twenty years ago during the summer, and directed by the great Mike Nichols.

Also notable in the cast are David Hyde Pierce and Christopher Plummer.

On a slow summer Saturday night, it is worth checking out.

Sunday Matinee at Chess Cinemas

American-Pie-movie-01

It’s hard to believe that it has been fifteen years since American Pie (1999) was released.

I remember watching this movie, out of tradition, the night before a big exam in law school to unwind and get into a relaxed frame of mind after the studying had been done.

This is a classic comedy, ahead of its time in some respects, with memorable and often-quoted characters like Stifler, Oz, Jimbo, and Finch, among others.

Check it out, or re-watch it.

Sunday Matinee at Chess Cinemas

the-bridge-on-the-river-kwai

With its unforgettable and timeless theme tune, The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957) is certainly worth a viewing. William Holden, Alec Guinness, and Jack Hawkins lead a spirited cast in this World War II epic.

via imdb:

After settling his differences with a Japanese PoW camp commander, a British colonel co-operates to oversee his men’s construction of a railway bridge for their captors – while oblivious to a plan by the Allies to destroy it.

Saturday Night at Chess Cinemas

the-sting-by-bamdotorg11

The Sting (1973) is a top twenty film for me, as Paul Newman and Robert Redford team up to pull the con of all cons versus a criminal banker.

Robert Shaw and Charles Durning add to the gritty yet playful nature of the period piece set in 1930′s Chicago, where the slightest hand gesture can be the tipoff that you are about to get fleeced in a horse race.

Check it out.

Via Youtube:

Directed by George Roy Hill and starring Paul Newman Robert Redford Robert Shaw Charles Durning and Ray Walston Set in the 1930′s this intricate caper deals with an ambitious small-time crook and a veteran con man who seek revenge on a vicious crime lord who murdered one of their gang. Universal – 1973

Saturday Night at Chess Cinemas

vlcsnap-2010-08-31-01h43m07s108.png

One of Ben Stiller’s better non-comedy performances can be seen portraying a real-life drug addict in Permanent Midnight (1998), also starring the stunning Maria Bello and Owen Wilson.

Critics and audiences alike did not seem too fond of this film, but I believe it is underrated and worth a viewing.

via imdb.com

Comedy writer Jerry Stahl, whose $6000-a-week heroin habit had him taking his infant daughter along on his drug runs and doing smack during TV script conferences. Departing detox, Stahl explores memories with survivor Kitty, who listens patiently to Stahl’s flashback. Other women in Stahl’s life are his British wife Sandra and his agent Vola. For the TV series “Mr. Chompers” (inspired by ALF), Stahl meets with sitcom exec Craig Ziffer and puppeteer Allen. For freaky freebasing, Stahl hangs with mumbler Nicky and druggie Gus.

Sunday Matinee at Chess Cinemas

Battle-at-Fort-McHenry

I present a double feature on this Fourth of July weekend matinee.

First, we have Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942), starring the great James Cagney in a biography of the talented musical composer, playwright, actor, dancer, and singer George M. Cohan.

Next, a grittier and more controversial watch is Born on the Fourth of July (1989), directed by Oliver Stone and starring Tom Cruise as a paralyzed and disgruntled Vietnam Vet.

 

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