The Important Matter of my Semi-Retirement from iBC

My first post here at iBC was on November 12th, 2007iBankCoin and System Trading with Woodshedder were forged in the fires of the approaching Armageddon, and I believe the blogging and the trading that took place during that period of time left an indelible mark on my psychology. In 2007 and 2008 I was transitioning from a purely technical swing trading style to something more quantitative. I had experienced years of success with discretionary trading, but as mentioned above, something about that period of time changed me. If memory serves, I finished 2008 up 10%, which was fairly remarkable considering everything that happened.

Six years ago, many things were different about finance and financial blogging. The retail investor had risen like a phoenix from the ashes of the 2000 bear market. They still believed that they could beat the market, and beat the experts. Technology and software was exploding, and these developments gave the little guy a belief (maybe an erroneous one) that they could stand shoulder to shoulder with “professionals” (I use that term lightly). Then came the crash of 2008.

Fast forward to 2013, and I think the strength and numbers of the retail investor have been greatly diminished. Conversely, the strength and numbers of finance websites and bloggers have greatly increased. For a small fish like myself, this makes it hard to excel as competition grows and the number of interested eyeballs decreases.

There are numerous sites out there that exist in pretty much the same space as my blog. These bloggers, researches, statisticians and traders are very good at what they do, and they do it full-time.  My full-time job has become more and more demanding, and the outcomes that I can produce there are much more important to our planet than whether or not I can write about quantifiable strategies that can beat the market. As I have become more and more invested in the work I do full-time, the number of hours I spend on it have increased in both mental and physical terms. My boys, 12 and 7, and my wife, also compete for my attention. In the end, something had to give, and it just makes sense that the 1-2 hours a evening that I spend researching and writing is not generating enough of a return to be sustainable.

I love iBankCoin. This blog has been a huge part of my life for a long time. Blogging here has afforded me incredible opportunities. I have met incredible people, and I have been able to use it to network with people who have helped me develop my skills in a way that would never have been possible without the blog.

I will still write here from time to time. I plan to keep posting updates to my Fidelity Sector Rotational System, and I would like to write about abnormal market behaviors. But I can no longer keep up the day-to-day updates.

To my partners Fly, Chess, RC, and Mr. Cain Thaler,  keep up the excellent work fellas. Fly, I think you know that I hold you in the highest regard, and you are without a doubt one of the few distinguished gentlemen left in this world.

If anyone would like to contact me in the future, my email is woodshedder73 at the google mail.

Best to everyone,

Wood

Top 5 Fidelity Sector Funds

Pardon my absence this weekend. I was detained by the government due to being flagged by the NSA.

Below are the top 5 Fidelity Sector Funds as ranked by my Fidelity sector fund rotational system.

  1. FSPCX (Insurance)
  2. FBIOX (Biotechnology)
  3. FSPHX (Healthcare)
  4. FPHAX (Pharmaceuticals)
  5. FSCPX (Consumer Discretionary)

I still find this to be a weird mix. I’m not sure what it says about the coming Obamacare implementation, if anything.

Year-to-date, the system has returned 13%. For the record, Sell in May would have once again not been a bad idea, assuming one didn’t sell at the beginning of the month.

$SPY has returned 15.7% year-to-date.

The Important Matter of my Semi-Retirement from iBC

My first post here at iBC was on November 12th, 2007iBankCoin and System Trading with Woodshedder were forged in the fires of the approaching Armageddon, and I believe the blogging and the trading that took place during that period of time left an indelible mark on my psychology. In 2007 and 2008 I was transitioning from a purely technical swing trading style to something more quantitative. I had experienced years of success with discretionary trading, but as mentioned above, something about that period of time changed me. If memory serves, I finished 2008 up 10%, which was fairly remarkable considering everything that happened.

Six years ago, many things were different about finance and financial blogging. The retail investor had risen like a phoenix from the ashes of the 2000 bear market. They still believed that they could beat the market, and beat the experts. Technology and software was exploding, and these developments gave the little guy a belief (maybe an erroneous one) that they could stand shoulder to shoulder with “professionals” (I use that term lightly). Then came the crash of 2008.

Fast forward to 2013, and I think the strength and numbers of the retail investor have been greatly diminished. Conversely, the strength and numbers of finance websites and bloggers have greatly increased. For a small fish like myself, this makes it hard to excel as competition grows and the number of interested eyeballs decreases.

There are numerous sites out there that exist in pretty much the same space as my blog. These bloggers, researches, statisticians and traders are very good at what they do, and they do it full-time.  My full-time job has become more and more demanding, and the outcomes that I can produce there are much more important to our planet than whether or not I can write about quantifiable strategies that can beat the market. As I have become more and more invested in the work I do full-time, the number of hours I spend on it have increased in both mental and physical terms. My boys, 12 and 7, and my wife, also compete for my attention. In the end, something had to give, and it just makes sense that the 1-2 hours a evening that I spend researching and writing is not generating enough of a return to be sustainable.

I love iBankCoin. This blog has been a huge part of my life for a long time. Blogging here has afforded me incredible opportunities. I have met incredible people, and I have been able to use it to network with people who have helped me develop my skills in a way that would never have been possible without the blog.

I will still write here from time to time. I plan to keep posting updates to my Fidelity Sector Rotational System, and I would like to write about abnormal market behaviors. But I can no longer keep up the day-to-day updates.

To my partners Fly, Chess, RC, and Mr. Cain Thaler,  keep up the excellent work fellas. Fly, I think you know that I hold you in the highest regard, and you are without a doubt one of the few distinguished gentlemen left in this world.

If anyone would like to contact me in the future, my email is woodshedder73 at the google mail.

Best to everyone,

Wood

Top 5 Fidelity Sector Funds

Pardon my absence this weekend. I was detained by the government due to being flagged by the NSA.

Below are the top 5 Fidelity Sector Funds as ranked by my Fidelity sector fund rotational system.

  1. FSPCX (Insurance)
  2. FBIOX (Biotechnology)
  3. FSPHX (Healthcare)
  4. FPHAX (Pharmaceuticals)
  5. FSCPX (Consumer Discretionary)

I still find this to be a weird mix. I’m not sure what it says about the coming Obamacare implementation, if anything.

Year-to-date, the system has returned 13%. For the record, Sell in May would have once again not been a bad idea, assuming one didn’t sell at the beginning of the month.

$SPY has returned 15.7% year-to-date.

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