Thoughts On Uranium Prices

The big thing holding back the uranium miners right now isn’t concern for the long term viability of the industry – to the contrary, it is very clear to everyone that nuclear power generation is about to increase. Even concern in the US over aging reactors being taken offline is being tempered as four new state of the art models have been approved for construction.

Actually, the major impediment to higher prices is just the spot price for U3O8. The broker I follow has reported the spot price has just corrected back to new lows (based on how many virtually non-existent sales, I cannot say). URA meanwhile shows prices have corrected from the recent rally, although still off the bottom.

In that spirit, here is what I’m reading.

Uranium Participation Corp (TSX:U) is the only physically backed uranium fund. The company’s primary objective is to achieve appreciation in the value of its uranium holdings through increases in the uranium spot price. In December, Raymond James analyst David Sadowski made a case for investing in UPC, a fund managed by the management team responsible for Denison Mines (TSX:DML), explaining that the fund offers investors with “great exposure to a uranium price rebound without the typical exploration, development or mining risks associated with some of the other equities.”

After having completed a $57.6 million bought deal financing on February 6, UPC has made its first purchase of uranium in four years. The company announced on Friday that it would use a portion of bought deal financing to purchase 850,000 pounds of U3O8 at an average cost of US$34.74. UPC notes that 250,000 pounds have already been delivered, the remainder will be delivered by the end of June.

In a note to investors, David Sadowski views UPC’s latest announcement as a point in the company’s favor, supported by the overall sentiment that uranium prices are set to strengthen over the next 12 to 14 months on supply shortfalls and JApanese reactor restarts. Given these variables, and the companies current available cash, Sadowski expects to see another purchase of 800, 000 – 900,000 pounds of uranium sometime in the coming weeks.

I’m still confident we see nuclear take off this year. In the past I’ve been a little more shy about such a direct claim, arguing “sometime in the next X years,” instead. But I do believe 2014 will be the year.

I also think the volatile pricing we’re seeing is the market putting in a bottom / shaking out the weak hands as the big players start to take a more direct financial interest.

Recall from our prior discussions that the refueling needs of real reactors is almost logistics free. A nuclear reactor can run at full power for almost three years without needing a delivery of fuel from the outside, on nothing but what’s in the rods plus the typical amount of fuel in storage for a common model.

From 2011, three years is almost up. By which, I would surmise, nuclear power operations in aggregate will either begin to see electricity output decline, or else need to make a purchase.

Just my two cents on the matter.

BAS Continuing The Epic Run

Check out Basic Energy Services, up another 4.5%, flirting with $27.00 as it steadily pounds its way to $30.00.

HCLP is playfully tagging along, after the doldrums took it down back below $40.00 this week. And well it should – they’re in the same industry after all. What’s good for BAS is great for HCLP.

Uranium is slack and UEC is dying (very small position). CCJ is back to it’s old range, and I am saddened by that.

But this is a buying opportunity make no mistake of that.

Uranium Is Dead Again

Never mind everyone; you may return to your homes. Nuclear power is once again a dead end and the world should put itself on an immediate path to expunge it from all usage.

Japan will continue to import natural gas, ad infinitum, to the detriment of every man and woman. Germany will make good on their threat to eradicate nuclear power from the grid, replacing the load with power supply from rainbows without breaking their guidance of not building out any additional renewable energy, or their other pledge of not adding to carbon emissions (those three commitments clearly not contradicting one another in any way).

China will stop being a place.

Sell all nuclear based assets promptly to $0.00 (I am not selling any nuclear assets).

BAS And CCJ Resume Trend Higher

The run higher continues, with CCJ and BAS both up over a percent again today. AEC and NRP are trading flat. UEC is north of 4% gains, but it’s small so no one cares.

HCLP is down, naturally. That’s my pick for March madness; so it has to be the lone skunk of my portfolio. Not to worry, not to worry. Just as soon as any chance of personal glory is off the table, it too will continue the run higher, making me a silent, very non-public, fortune.

Can’t give me marketable material that easily, now can we?

Just sit back and enjoy the show. The indices no longer matter to me. Rather, the public storytelling is shifting into my corner now. This is the Atomic Year, the Fracking Year – financial journalists need something to yap about, and my assets will be it.

And accordingly, that makes this the Thaler Year.

The Gains Keep Coming

Now it’s uranium’s turn to takeoff. CCJ is lifting 7.5% today, and counting. UEC is up 8.8%. This is much more serious money for me.

On the natural gas side, HCLP and BAS are both full sized positions. But CCJ is a mammoth stake; we’re talking 20% of my book alone. Today’s move is adding 1.5% to my gross account change (which is slightly being offset by minor corrections elsewhere).

I have a big bet on uranium prices and the miners. If they make it this year, it will be one for the records.

Added To CCJ, Otherwise Doing Nothing

I added more CCJ for $20.40. I had slimmed the position at $21.80 when I raised cash across the board at the top.

CCJ is always a buy around or below $20.

Other than that, I’m sitting on my hands, with >40% cash. I’m not convinced we don’t keep selling off, but am open to change. Valuations are crazy, but where else are you putting your money?

Bernanke is gone, but Yellen is hardly a hawk.

We’re at about a 5.5% selloff in the S&P. I’d feel a little more sure footed if we were at 10%. That at least would mark a real correction, and would probably require the flattening of a handful of the most serial offenders of the hope trade. The most egregious of inflated share prices, like the TW’s and TSLA’s of the world…

I’m excited by how well BAS has held up during this selloff. That stock normally passes out at a nearby sneeze. Maybe all the soft hands have finally relinquished their last pitiful handful of shares, so that the firm grip of men can rally the company?

Thoughts On Uranium Prices

The big thing holding back the uranium miners right now isn’t concern for the long term viability of the industry – to the contrary, it is very clear to everyone that nuclear power generation is about to increase. Even concern in the US over aging reactors being taken offline is being tempered as four new state of the art models have been approved for construction.

Actually, the major impediment to higher prices is just the spot price for U3O8. The broker I follow has reported the spot price has just corrected back to new lows (based on how many virtually non-existent sales, I cannot say). URA meanwhile shows prices have corrected from the recent rally, although still off the bottom.

In that spirit, here is what I’m reading.

Uranium Participation Corp (TSX:U) is the only physically backed uranium fund. The company’s primary objective is to achieve appreciation in the value of its uranium holdings through increases in the uranium spot price. In December, Raymond James analyst David Sadowski made a case for investing in UPC, a fund managed by the management team responsible for Denison Mines (TSX:DML), explaining that the fund offers investors with “great exposure to a uranium price rebound without the typical exploration, development or mining risks associated with some of the other equities.”

After having completed a $57.6 million bought deal financing on February 6, UPC has made its first purchase of uranium in four years. The company announced on Friday that it would use a portion of bought deal financing to purchase 850,000 pounds of U3O8 at an average cost of US$34.74. UPC notes that 250,000 pounds have already been delivered, the remainder will be delivered by the end of June.

In a note to investors, David Sadowski views UPC’s latest announcement as a point in the company’s favor, supported by the overall sentiment that uranium prices are set to strengthen over the next 12 to 14 months on supply shortfalls and JApanese reactor restarts. Given these variables, and the companies current available cash, Sadowski expects to see another purchase of 800, 000 – 900,000 pounds of uranium sometime in the coming weeks.

I’m still confident we see nuclear take off this year. In the past I’ve been a little more shy about such a direct claim, arguing “sometime in the next X years,” instead. But I do believe 2014 will be the year.

I also think the volatile pricing we’re seeing is the market putting in a bottom / shaking out the weak hands as the big players start to take a more direct financial interest.

Recall from our prior discussions that the refueling needs of real reactors is almost logistics free. A nuclear reactor can run at full power for almost three years without needing a delivery of fuel from the outside, on nothing but what’s in the rods plus the typical amount of fuel in storage for a common model.

From 2011, three years is almost up. By which, I would surmise, nuclear power operations in aggregate will either begin to see electricity output decline, or else need to make a purchase.

Just my two cents on the matter.

BAS Continuing The Epic Run

Check out Basic Energy Services, up another 4.5%, flirting with $27.00 as it steadily pounds its way to $30.00.

HCLP is playfully tagging along, after the doldrums took it down back below $40.00 this week. And well it should – they’re in the same industry after all. What’s good for BAS is great for HCLP.

Uranium is slack and UEC is dying (very small position). CCJ is back to it’s old range, and I am saddened by that.

But this is a buying opportunity make no mistake of that.

Uranium Is Dead Again

Never mind everyone; you may return to your homes. Nuclear power is once again a dead end and the world should put itself on an immediate path to expunge it from all usage.

Japan will continue to import natural gas, ad infinitum, to the detriment of every man and woman. Germany will make good on their threat to eradicate nuclear power from the grid, replacing the load with power supply from rainbows without breaking their guidance of not building out any additional renewable energy, or their other pledge of not adding to carbon emissions (those three commitments clearly not contradicting one another in any way).

China will stop being a place.

Sell all nuclear based assets promptly to $0.00 (I am not selling any nuclear assets).

BAS And CCJ Resume Trend Higher

The run higher continues, with CCJ and BAS both up over a percent again today. AEC and NRP are trading flat. UEC is north of 4% gains, but it’s small so no one cares.

HCLP is down, naturally. That’s my pick for March madness; so it has to be the lone skunk of my portfolio. Not to worry, not to worry. Just as soon as any chance of personal glory is off the table, it too will continue the run higher, making me a silent, very non-public, fortune.

Can’t give me marketable material that easily, now can we?

Just sit back and enjoy the show. The indices no longer matter to me. Rather, the public storytelling is shifting into my corner now. This is the Atomic Year, the Fracking Year – financial journalists need something to yap about, and my assets will be it.

And accordingly, that makes this the Thaler Year.

The Gains Keep Coming

Now it’s uranium’s turn to takeoff. CCJ is lifting 7.5% today, and counting. UEC is up 8.8%. This is much more serious money for me.

On the natural gas side, HCLP and BAS are both full sized positions. But CCJ is a mammoth stake; we’re talking 20% of my book alone. Today’s move is adding 1.5% to my gross account change (which is slightly being offset by minor corrections elsewhere).

I have a big bet on uranium prices and the miners. If they make it this year, it will be one for the records.

Added To CCJ, Otherwise Doing Nothing

I added more CCJ for $20.40. I had slimmed the position at $21.80 when I raised cash across the board at the top.

CCJ is always a buy around or below $20.

Other than that, I’m sitting on my hands, with >40% cash. I’m not convinced we don’t keep selling off, but am open to change. Valuations are crazy, but where else are you putting your money?

Bernanke is gone, but Yellen is hardly a hawk.

We’re at about a 5.5% selloff in the S&P. I’d feel a little more sure footed if we were at 10%. That at least would mark a real correction, and would probably require the flattening of a handful of the most serial offenders of the hope trade. The most egregious of inflated share prices, like the TW’s and TSLA’s of the world…

I’m excited by how well BAS has held up during this selloff. That stock normally passes out at a nearby sneeze. Maybe all the soft hands have finally relinquished their last pitiful handful of shares, so that the firm grip of men can rally the company?

Previous Posts by Mr. Cain Thaler